Sorrento, Puglia and the Amalfi Coast

Day 2: Arrive in Naples where your personal guide meets you, takes you on a tour of the city and then you have lunch overlooking the Bay of Naples. You explore the remains of Pompeii in the afternoon before arriving at your deluxe hotel. (L, D) Day 3: A personally guided tour along the Amalfi Coast visiting Amalfi, Positano and Ravello with lunch along the way. ( B, L, D) Day 4: Sail on a private yacht to the island of Capri with your guide. Enjoy Anacapri and a light lunch in Piazzetta Square. (B, L, D) Read more »

Exclusive Italian Travel Programs

Ultitude.com and EyeItalia are proud to present the finest travel programs available anywhere to a broad array of Italian destinations… Sorrento, Puglia & the Amalfi Coast 8 Days: from $3,238 per person, including superior rooms in superior hotels, 6 breakfasts, 5 lunches and 6 dinners, cooking class, private yacht to […] Read more »

Sorrento & Puglia

Itinerary Highlights Day 1: Depart on your overnight flight to Italy Day 2: Arrive in Naples where your personal guide meets you, takes you on a tour of the city and then you have lunch overlooking the Bay of Naples. You explore the remains of Pompeii in the afternoon before […] Read more »

The Eternal Appeal of Amalfi: Sun, Sea and…Paper!

Surely other powerful maritime republics came in contact with fabric-based paper, but it was only the Amalfitani that went on to manufacture and dominate the ancient paper industry. Previously, documents had been recorded on either parchment made of animal skin or papyrus paper; both of which were inferior in quality and much more labor intensive and expensive to produce. Amalfi happened to have the perfect ingredients to produce a high quality paper: a constant source of water from the Latteri Mountains supplied by the Canneto River and plenty of cotton from it’s textile trading with the East. The timing was perfect too; the demand for paper was on the increase as the growing bureaucracy within the Catholic Church, foundling Universities and growing political powers increased the need of documentation: decrees, deeds, births, deaths and academic research. By the 13th century the industry was in full swing. Amalfi was bursting at the seams with a population of 70,000 and dominated trade in the European Mediterranean. Read more »